Burnt Bookmobile


Glenn Beck Helps Turn Anarchist Book Into Bestseller

What does many people consuming a book they don’t want to understand translate to?

From Publishers Weekly:

“The old saw that there is no such thing as bad publicity could be behind the success of The Coming Insurrection, published under the pen name the Invisible Committee, which rejects the official Left and aligns itself with the younger, wilder forms of resistance that have emerged in Europe against immigration control and the “war on terror.” Published by Semiotext(e), a small California press, best known for works of French cultural theory by Jean Baudrillard and Michel Foucault, the book has spent much of the week on Amazon’s top 10 bestsellers list, alongside better known titles like Game Change and The Help.

True, when Semiotext(e) launched its Intervention series last August with an English translation of The Coming Insurrection, it hit #24 at Amazon. After that it settled back to more typical numbers for a book with a 3,000-copy first printing, distributed by an academic press (MIT). Plus it’s available for free online in both English and French.

But even before the official pub date, The Coming Insurrection benefited from an “endorsement” from Glenn Beck. As part of a seven-minute rant on Fox News in July, he said, “I am not calling for a ban on this book. It’s important that you read this book.” Since then, each time Beck has talked about the book, sales have spiked, according to MIT Press associate publicist Diane Denner. It’s latest jump came after Beck devoted an entire segment to The Coming Insurrection, which he called “quite possibly the most evil thing I’ve ever read.”

The book’s initial U.S. launch was equally, well, anarchistic. It began with an unscheduled reading on a summer evening at the Union Square Barnes & Noble in New York City. The reader refused to leave until the police arrived. Then the reading regrouped at a nearby cosmetics store.

As a result of the publicity generated by the reading, which was written up in the New York Times, as well as reviews and Beck attacks, The Coming Insurrection is now in its sixth printing. “We’re having trouble keeping stock in the warehouse,” says MIT Press assistant director Rebecca Schrader. “And we’re dealing with reprint quantities that we don’t see every day.”

Written following the 2005 riots in the Paris suburbs, The Coming Insurrection has generated its fair share of negative publicity in France, where it was published in 2007. The French government called it a manual of terror and arrested a group of people in 2008 known as the Tarnac 9, one of whom, it alleged, was the book’s author. The Tarnac 9 were accused of disabling power lines that stranded thousands of passengers on high-speed trains. As of last May, The Coming Insurrection had sold 25,000 copies in France, according to its French publisher, La Fabrique. The French weekly magazine L’Express puts the number higher, at 40,000.”

http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/449785-Glenn_Beck_Helps_Turn_Anarchist_Book_Into_Bestseller.php

More of Glenn Beck proving he hasn’t read the book



a rock, a chain, chairs and an atm
02/18/2010, 8:34 PM
Filed under: war-machine | Tags: , , , , , , ,

All go through the window…



Introduction to After the Fall: Communiques from Occupied California (excerpt)
02/17/2010, 11:15 PM
Filed under: war-machine | Tags: , , , ,

This is a new periodical / magazine regarding the recent wave of occupations in California.  The bookmobile should have 50 copes for free soon.

Excerpt:

I. Like A Winter With A Thousand Decembers

In Greece, they throw molotovs in the street. For every reason under the sun: in defense of their friends, to burn down the state, for old time’s sake, for the hell of it, to mark the death of a kid the cops killed for no reason. For no reason. They light Christmas trees on fire. December is the new May. They smash windows, they turn up paving stones, they fight the cops because their future went missing, along with the economy, a few years ago. They occupy buildings to find one another, to be together in the same place, to have a base from which to carry out raids, to drink and fuck, to talk philosophy. The cops smash into packs of their friends on motorbikes. They hold down the heads of their friends on the pavement and kick them in the face.

In Ssangyong, one thousand laid-off workers occupy an auto factory. They line up in formation with metal pipes, white helmets, red bandanas. Three thousand riot cops can’t get them out of their factory for seventy-seven days. They say they’re ready to die if they have to, and in the meantime they live on balls of rice and boiled rain. Besieged by helicopters, toxic tear gas, 50,000 volt guns, they fortify positions on the roof, constructing catapults to fire the bolts with which they used to build cars.

In Santiago, insurrectionary students mark the 40th anniversary of Pinochet’s coup by attacking police stations and shutting down the Universidad Academía de Humanismo Cristiano for ten days. No more deaths will be accepted, all will be avenged. In France, a couple of “agitators” dump a bucket of shit over the President of Université Rennes 2, as he commemorates the riots of the 2006 anti-CPE struggle with a two-minute public service announcement for corporate education. The video goes up on the web. It drops into slow motion as they flee the mezzanine after the action, not even masked. It’s easy, it’s light, it’s obvious. How else could one respond? What more is there to say? We know your quality policy. A cloud of thrown paper breaks like confetti in the space above the crowd below—a celebratory flourish. The video cuts to the outside of a building, scrawled with huge letters: Vive la Commune.

In Vienna, in Zagreb, in Freiburg—in hundreds of universities across central and eastern Europe—students gather in the auditoriums of occupied buildings, holding general assemblies, discussing modalities of self-determination. They didn’t used to pay fees.  Now they do. Before the vacuum of standardization called the Bologna Process, their education wasn’t read off a pan-European fast food menu.  Now it is.  Fuck that, they say.  They call themselves The Academy of Refusal. They draw lines in the sand.  We will stay in these spaces as long as we can, and we will talk amongst ourselves, learn what we can learn from one another, on our own, together. We will take back the time they have stolen from us, that they’ll continue to steal, and we’ll take it back all at once, here and now.  In the time that we have thus spared, one of the things we will do is make videos in which we exhibit our wit, our beauty, our sovereign intelligence and our collective loveliness, and we’ll send them to our comrades in California.

In California, the kids write Occupy Everything on the walls. Demand Nothing, they write.  They turn over dumpsters and wedge them into the doorways of buildings with their friends locked inside. Outside, they throw massive Electro Communist dance parties. They crowd by the thousands around occupied buildings, and one of them rests her hand upon the police barriers. A cop tells her to move her hand. She says: “no.” He obliterates her finger with a baton. She has reconstructive surgery in the morning and returns to defend the occupation in the afternoon. We Are the Crisis, they say. They start blogs called Anti-Capital Projects; We Want Everything; Like Lost Children, the better to distribute their communiqués and insurrectionary pamphlets. Ergo, really living communism must be our goal, they write. We Have Decided Not to Die, they whisper. Students in Okinawa send them letters of solidarity signed Project Disagree. Wheeler, Kerr, Mrak, Dutton, Campbell, Kresge, Humanities 2….the names of the buildings they take become codewords. They relay, resonate, communicate. Those who take them gather and consolidate their forces by taking more. They gauge the measure of their common power. They know, immediately, that if they do not throw down, that if they do not scatter their rage throughout the stolid corridors of their universities, that if they do not prove their powers of negation, if they do not affirm their powers of construction, they will have failed their generation, failed the collective, failed history.

But why wouldn’t they throw down, and scatter, and prove, and negate, and affirm? After all, what the fuck else is there to do?

Read more



Vancouver Violence at the Olympics
02/14/2010, 2:07 PM
Filed under: war-machine | Tags: , , , ,

According to the SF gate:

“Police in riot gear confronted more than 200 masked protesters who hurled newspaper boxes through the display windows of a popular department store selling Olympic souvenirs.

Seven people were arrested after officers carrying clubs and shields quashed the downtown protest on the opening day of competition at the Winter Olympics. There were no immediate reports of injuries.”

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/02/13/SPBQ1C1F0T.DTL

(maybe more will be posted as it comes)



Willful Disobedience (book)

The bookmobile will have 15 copies as soon as they are shipped to us and they will cost $9 each.

From Little Black Cart:

“The collected writings of Wolfi Landstreicher’s Willful Disobedience. Originally published as a zine from 1996 to 2006, Willful Disobedience was a continuously evolving provocation directed towards anarchists and fellow vagabonds to dig deeper into critical thought and joyous rebellion.

During the ten years of publication, Willful Disobedience wove together a web of ideas situation in the following threads: an anarchism based in Stirner-influenced egoism; an insurrectionary approach that sees individual insurrection to be as important as social insurrection; a non-primitivist critique of civilization that provides no program or model for a future society; explorations into a class analysis that rejects marxian categories, seeking to understand social relationships as they actually exist; insisting upon the need for anarchists to develop a coherent practice of theory capable of calling everything into question, including one’s own ideas; and an anti-political perspective, critical of leftism, democracy, identity politics and political correctitude.”


Archive of willful disobedience texts:

http://www.omnipresence.mahost.org/vbp.htm



Radio Alice Film ‘Lavorare con lentezza’ Screening at the CCC (tonight…)
02/11/2010, 12:45 PM
Filed under: Milwaukee area | Tags: , , , ,

I know this is a bit late…

“Italy 1970’s – a period of massive social conflict. Two young people take a job digging a tunnel for another person’s bank heist out of a shared detest for the work that left one’s father dead and the other’s dead alive in the factory. While digging, they become intrigued by the messages coming from pirate radio station 100.6FM radio alice. In seeking out the station and eventually helping to contribute content, the two are exposed to a smattering of (anti)political ideas and ways of living. In the end, it is left up to the viewers to sort through and pick out which ideas hold value and which should be guarded against.”

7PM
free



French Commune-ism Discussion Supplementary Readings

Especially with these ideas it can be very helpful to have a more thorough preliminary reading of texts which have influenced the Invisible Committee / TIQQUN / the Imaginary Party  and other things they’ve written. Introduction to Civil War is coming out in a few weeks, so maybe it’s a bit silly to have this on the list, but since it came out before Call or The Coming Insurrection it should hopefully offer some further insight into and give a more rounded understanding of the ideas.  Some other good places to focus on as a start would be: Foucault’s History of Sexuality volume 1: the Introduction, The Coming Community (of which the title of TCI references) and Other texts by Giorgio Agamben.

If people have other suggestions please share them. Texts that specifically deal theoretically with communization would be helpful.  The first issue of Endnotes is a good place to start for a general understanding of the idea and history, but this isn’t exactly the same place that the Invisible Committee is coming from.

Supplementary Readings:

-The Coming Insurrection by The Invisible Committee (book)

-Introduction to Civil War by TIQQUN (book)

-Invisible Politics: An Introduction to Contemporary Communization by John Cunningham

-Human Strike After Human Strike by Johann Kaspar (from Occupied London #4)

-Bring Out Your Dead by the Endnotes Collective



February Winter Anarchist Discussion: French Commune-ism

This month focuses on the contemporary theoretical contributions of the French comrades of Tiqqun, the Invisible Committee, etc who make strategic proposals for the current biopolitical conditions of social war. These texts deal with the physical life of humans and identity as a terrain of civil war, decategorization as a tactical necessity, and friendship as a weapon, to name just a few things…

If you’ve ever been interested in or confused by these ideas (human-strike, whatever singularity, form-of-life, civil war, etc), please come.

All texts are available at the CCC (732 e Clarke st.) or here to print out.

Feb. 7thCall

Feb. 14thHow is it to be done?

Feb. 21stReady-Made Artists and Human Strike

Feb. 28th – Preliminary Materials on the Jeune Fille (coming soon)

“human strike

after human strike, to reach

the insurrection,

where there is nothing but,

where we are all,

whatever

singularities.”
-How is it to be done?




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