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more new zines of note

All put together by a new formatting project and distro called Petroleuse Press

Their about section:

“For most Americans, the image of the pétroleuse setting buildings and homes ablaze (either to delay the invasion of troops or simply to gratify her ”love of riot”) confirmed the connection between feminist agitation, political revolution, economic conflict, and cultural catastrophe. “Pale, frenzied, … [and] fierce,” as a poet in Harper’s Weekly described them, the pétroleuses presented a nightmarish specter of women aggressively repudiating bourgeois norms of womanhood. Many witnesses (and subsequent commentators) identified the arsonists as prostitutes, morally dizzied by their distance from domestic life, hystericized by their all-too-public vocation and their abandonment to their bodies. Most commentators did not distinguish the pétroleuses from other women of the [Paris] Commune, all of whom they saw as rowdy, reckless affronts to nature. Given over to unfeminine theorizing and public speaking, these woman formed clubs where they urged the legalization of divorce and women’s sexual independence. (As historians have subsequently detailed, they also smoked pipes, toted pistols, and wore revolutionary garb, delighting audiences, male and female, who thronged the clubs to see them.) These feminists led marches and fought at the barricades. During the Bloody Week, they reportedly not only set fire to homes and civic buildings but also plundered the city, gave enemy soldiers poisoned wine, and murdered officers after they had surrendered – atrocities recounted in dozens of histories, short stories, novels, poems, and plays about the Paris Commune though the turn of the century.”

- D.A. Zimmerman, Panic!: Markets, Crises, & Crowds in American Fiction (2006)

In Other Words, the Situation is Excellent: an Interview with Julien Coupat

“Q. The police consider you the leader of a group on the point of tipping over into terrorism. What do you think about that?

A. Such a pathetic allegation can only be the work of a regime that is on the point of tipping over into nothingness.”

Capitalism: a Very Special Delirium

“”underneath all reason lies delirium, drift…”
an interview with Deleuze and Guattari”

1914: One or Several Wolves?

“Lines of flight or of deterritorialization, becoming-wolf, becoming-inhuman, deterritorialized intensities: that is what multiplicity is. To become wolf or to become hole is to deterritorialize oneself following distinct but entangled lines. A hole is no more negative than a wolf. Castration, lack, substitution: a tale told by an overconscious idiot who has no understanding of multiplicities as formations of the unconscious. A wolf is a hole, they are both particles of the unconscious, nothing but particles, productions of particles, particulate paths, as elements of molecular multiplicities. It is not even sufficient to say that intense and moving particles pass through holes; a hole is just as much a particle as what passes through it. Physicists say that holes are not the absence of particles but particles traveling faster than the speed of light. Flying anuses, speeding vaginas, there is no castration.”



Not Bored #41 (Book about Guy Debord and “The Tarnac Nine”)

The Burnt Bookmobile now has copies of Not Bored issue #41 which unlike most other issues was printed as a book. They are $7 dollars per copy.

It contains:

“1. Never-before-translated texts by Debord.
2. News accounts of the selling of his archives.
3. Defenses of Debord against various “post-Modern” theorists.
4. Texts by or about the Invisible Committee, who are thought to be influenced by Debord.
5. Texts by or about the Tarnac Nine, who are thought to be the author(s) of “The Coming Insurrection.””

The Not Bored website functions as an archive of both old issues of Not Bored and many of previously untranslated situationist related texts.




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